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My kitty has recently lossed hair around eyes and has a receding hair line.

AnnaH

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Joined
Jun 24, 2021
Messages
21
Hello friends,

I took a feral kitten I was feeding and socializing over the summer in on September 1st. (kitty is now about 9 months). Her father (my indoor/outoor cat and her brother (also indoor/outdoor) live with us. She is only indoors. About 2 months ago she started losing hair around her eye lids and has a receding hairline. I took her to the vet and she said this is normal and Jinxie is healthybut it doesn't feel right. I don't know if it is a coincidence or not but I noticed it started around the time I have been treating her (all of them) with Revolution Flea medicine. I have attached photos so you can see the difference in her eyes lids and hairline. I am sad to see this because she looked healthier as a feral than she does having a healthy. good life indoors. Any insight is greatly appreciated.Thank you! PS.Since taking her in she has only had the a dewormer pyrantel once, the rabies vaccine and 3 rounds of Revolution flea medicine. I wonder If she is having a reaction to Revolution? THANK YOU! Wishing healing for all the fur babies!

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Dr. Sara

Veterinarian
HA! Faculty
Joined
Dec 30, 2018
Messages
290
Dear Anna,
Many cats do have thin hair between their eyes and ears, which is likely why your vet said that it was normal. However, as this is a new development for Jinx, it indicates an imbalance in the body. Powerful flea products like selamectin are a significant burden for the body to eliminate.

Here is the information sheet at Drugs.com for selamectin:
Pruritus (itch) is a side effect, which could lead to hair loss. There are many other possible problems listed.

When a product has many potential side effects, you only want to use it when it is absolutely essential. If your cats' flea problem is controlled, I would investigate less toxic methods of flea control. Toxic topical products are more problematic to house cats, as there is less air circulation in the home, so the cat is exposed to the product to a greater extent.
Regards,
Dr. Sara
 

AnnaH

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Joined
Jun 24, 2021
Messages
21
Oh my goodness, I feel so bad I just gave her some today. It is their third dose. I will not give it to her anymore moving forward. I was concerned because all three cats we’re itching a little bit. And as I said two of them are indoor/outdoor. I feel so guilty for giving this to her again. If I stop using this moving forward is there a chance her hair will grow back? She is a feral cat that is just now getting comfortable being touched So I cannot spray her with other products such as essential oils and such. . If you have any other suggestions I would greatly appreciate it. I am also giving all three cats two supplements that my holistic doctor recommended to help clear this medication out of their system. Dr. Judy Herman Holistic Vet Referred by Dr jeff. I will share with you the names of these two supplements. She told me to give them this for one week after taking a dose. Hopefully this helps them recover. I hope I have not done any permanent damage? Thank you for your support.
 

AnnaH

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Joined
Jun 24, 2021
Messages
21
Here are the supplements Dr Judy Herman Holiatic amended. They are by standard process. They are called Thymex and Parotid and are whole food supplements, not homeopathic remedies. i pray this helps.
 

Dr. Sara

Veterinarian
HA! Faculty
Joined
Dec 30, 2018
Messages
290
Dear Anna,
Dr. Herman is an excellent holistic vet, and I would certainly follow her recommendations. You need to decide how you can most gently and effectively address the flea problem. It is always a balancing act when kitties are hard to treat. In your situation, home control of fleas is essential to minimize the number of cat treatments.

Many people do not see fleas on their pets, especially if the pet grooms itself well. Fleas are also less likely to spend much time on short haired animals. Fleas are on pets to get a blood meal; the rest of the time they are in the environment, mating and laying eggs. You may see tiny, comma shaped black grains in the pet's hair coat. This is flea excreta, and it is a sure sign that fleas have been present.

Fleas need to be addressed on the pet, in the home, and in the environment. I prefer to use very safe and gentle flea treatments. A flea treatment with warnings to keep it off your skin and to avoid breathing the vapours is not something I would recommend.

The product I prefer is Wondercide; this is all that I use on my hairy dogs, but it may need to be applied daily or every other day if the pet is encountering a lot of fleas. Wondercide is available on line; they have an on line list of area retailers, and we carry the body spray at the AMC of Watkins Park. There are other safe herbal treatments, and a spray called Bio-UD is very effective. Bio-UD is best suited for short haired pets, as it makes the coat greasy. These safer treatments will likely need to be applied more often than the more powerful flea products. Cats can be difficult to treat with sprays!

If the fleas have been feeding from your pet for any length of time, you should treat the house as there will be flea eggs and larvae present. There are many house treatments, including one from Wondercide. It is important to use enough house treatment for the area which is affected; this includes all areas to which the pet has access, as well as at least two six foot 'flea jumps' away from that area. Read the instructions carefully, as some house treatments require all animals to leave the house for a certain period of time, and some are not safe if aquarium fish are in the house.

Borax and Diatomaceous earth (DE) specifically formulated to kill flea larvae are very safe house treatments, but they don't have the quick kill effect of the aerosol treatments. These are most useful for mild flea problems or to prevent reinfestation of the home. DE can also be used outside the home in areas where pets like to rest.

There are more products that may be helpful. Natural products vary in their effectiveness because they are working with the body's own defenses. Please check what has been effective for other people in the forum.

People rarely see fleas in the house - they hide down in the carpeting and furniture. A flea trap (a bowl of soapy water under a small light at night - there is a lot of information on the Internet on how to do this) is an effective way to monitor for the presence of fleas in the house. If you see very few or no fleas in the trap (provided it is placed where the animals frequent) then you are pretty certain that the animals are bringing in the fleas.
Dr. Sara
 

Dr. Jeff

Administrator
Moderator
Veterinarian
Joined
Feb 23, 2017
Messages
3,746
Hi Anna-

Jinxie is adorable!

Definitely don't feel badly about today's Revolution dose. It may actually be a good thing!

That's because now you'll better be able to see her body improve (and coat improve) despite the presence of potential obstacles.

"Potential" because any reaction to anything in the environment, like a virus, bacteria, possible toxin, etc. is an expression of the susceptibility (sensitivity) of that pet to the stressor.

When internal balance is improved (which is what you and Dr. Judy are working on) then that susceptibility is reduced.

What do you feed Jinxie?

What gives her the zoomies and makes her super happy?

In my experience, a species-appropriate (real meat) based diet and the higher vitality foods like raw, heart, kidney, etc. along with increased happiness (the more purring the better) will help her body do its' job of healing.


top.png
 

AnnaH

All Access Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2021
Messages
21
Dear Anna,
Dr. Herman is an excellent holistic vet, and I would certainly follow her recommendations. You need to decide how you can most gently and effectively address the flea problem. It is always a balancing act when kitties are hard to treat. In your situation, home control of fleas is essential to minimize the number of cat treatments.

Many people do not see fleas on their pets, especially if the pet grooms itself well. Fleas are also less likely to spend much time on short haired animals. Fleas are on pets to get a blood meal; the rest of the time they are in the environment, mating and laying eggs. You may see tiny, comma shaped black grains in the pet's hair coat. This is flea excreta, and it is a sure sign that fleas have been present.

Fleas need to be addressed on the pet, in the home, and in the environment. I prefer to use very safe and gentle flea treatments. A flea treatment with warnings to keep it off your skin and to avoid breathing the vapours is not something I would recommend.

The product I prefer is Wondercide; this is all that I use on my hairy dogs, but it may need to be applied daily or every other day if the pet is encountering a lot of fleas. Wondercide is available on line; they have an on line list of area retailers, and we carry the body spray at the AMC of Watkins Park. There are other safe herbal treatments, and a spray called Bio-UD is very effective. Bio-UD is best suited for short haired pets, as it makes the coat greasy. These safer treatments will likely need to be applied more often than the more powerful flea products. Cats can be difficult to treat with sprays!

If the fleas have been feeding from your pet for any length of time, you should treat the house as there will be flea eggs and larvae present. There are many house treatments, including one from Wondercide. It is important to use enough house treatment for the area which is affected; this includes all areas to which the pet has access, as well as at least two six foot 'flea jumps' away from that area. Read the instructions carefully, as some house treatments require all animals to leave the house for a certain period of time, and some are not safe if aquarium fish are in the house.

Borax and Diatomaceous earth (DE) specifically formulated to kill flea larvae are very safe house treatments, but they don't have the quick kill effect of the aerosol treatments. These are most useful for mild flea problems or to prevent reinfestation of the home. DE can also be used outside the home in areas where pets like to rest.

There are more products that may be helpful. Natural products vary in their effectiveness because they are working with the body's own defenses. Please check what has been effective for other people in the forum.

People rarely see fleas in the house - they hide down in the carpeting and furniture. A flea trap (a bowl of soapy water under a small light at night - there is a lot of information on the Internet on how to do this) is an effective way to monitor for the presence of fleas in the house. If you see very few or no fleas in the trap (provided it is placed where the animals frequent) then you are pretty certain that the animals are bringing in the fleas.
Dr. Sara
Thank you, Dr. Sara. I actually have Wondercide! I was using it on my indoor/outdoor cat When he was the only one living in my house. He got fed up with me spraying him and did not want to come home anymore. He also started growling at me. Ha ha. This is when I felt I had to turn to revolution. Then I brought in his two children who were Feral kittens. There is no way these two ferals will let me spray them with Wonder side. I have however sprayed my apartment down with it before. I will continue to use the spray in the furniture. I will definitely do the Soapy water test. Thank you for the recommendation. I will also try to comb all of the cats. Do you have a recommendation for a good flea comb?

I am very grateful I am in good hands with Dr. Herman. This forum is amazing. I feel so much support. Thank you thank you
 

AnnaH

All Access Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2021
Messages
21
Hi Anna-

Jinxie is adorable!

Definitely don't feel badly about today's Revolution dose. It may actually be a good thing!

That's because now you'll better be able to see her body improve (and coat improve) despite the presence of potential obstacles.

"Potential" because any reaction to anything in the environment, like a virus, bacteria, possible toxin, etc. is an expression of the susceptibility (sensitivity) of that pet to the stressor.

When internal balance is improved (which is what you and Dr. Judy are working on) then that susceptibility is reduced.

What do you feed Jinxie?

What gives her the zoomies and makes her super happy?

In my experience, a species-appropriate (real meat) based diet and the higher vitality foods like raw, heart, kidney, etc. along with increased happiness (the more purring the better) will help her body do its' job of healing.


top.png
Hello Dr. Jeff,

Thank you so much for the encouragement and emotional support. I don’t feel as bad for giving Jinxie revolution.

I feed Jinxie Darwin’s raw food but cook it halfway to transition her. I also started adding wild blueberries. I’m going to do your blended kale/blueberry recommendation as well.

Per your lovely recommendation, I bought her freeze dried minnows and I throw a treat across the floor and she loves to run/hunt for it. I also bought Stella and chewies chicken and beef Hearts. She likes all of these. I think I will also try some crickets as you said.

I love how you said ‘zoomies’ ❤️😃

Thank you for the flyer with the information you attached. What is snuffle mat?

Do you think jinxie will get her hair back?

Thank you so much for all the amazing guidance you share with all of us. God bless you.

Anna
 

Dr. Jeff

Administrator
Moderator
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Joined
Feb 23, 2017
Messages
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You're welcome Anna.

Ah, the snuffle mat! It's a tool for stimulating breathing, connection and engagement in dogs and cats (like puppy and kitty pranayama).

Aviva (my new kitty) runs into the bedroom every morning to use the snuffle mat that Archie (my dog) just finished using. After all, she may find a crumb that he missed.

Yes, she will get her hair back if that's what nature intends. She's super vital (youngsters of every species have lots of vitality) kitty who will heal if we allow her to do so.
 

AnnaH

All Access Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2021
Messages
21
You're welcome Anna.

Ah, the snuffle mat! It's a tool for stimulating breathing, connection and engagement in dogs and cats (like puppy and kitty pranayama).

Aviva (my new kitty) runs into the bedroom every morning to use the snuffle mat that Archie (my dog) just finished using. After all, she may find a crumb that he missed.

Yes, she will get her hair back if that's what nature intends. She's super vital (youngsters of every species have lots of vitality) kitty who will heal if we allow her to do so.
You have such a compelling way to speaking. I love it. I will get the kitties a snuffle mat. So happy to learn about this. I was looking for a Christmas gift for them. :) I also noticed you mentioned red meat is good for cats! I didn't know this. I will get some grass-fed beef. I have tried bone marrow as well. I hope she gets her hair back. She purrs a lot. :) Wishing you all many blessings for all you do!

Anna
 

Dr. Jeff

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Joined
Feb 23, 2017
Messages
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Thanks so much Anna!

Jinxie will do great (and regrow her hair)!!

Here's a little video of Aviva that Amy (my wife) recorded one am.

 

Dr. Jeff

Administrator
Moderator
Veterinarian
Joined
Feb 23, 2017
Messages
3,746
Also, the "Busy Box" is another way to engage Jinxie and increase her sniffing to speed her healing:

 

AnnaH

All Access Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2021
Messages
21
Dear Anna,
Many cats do have thin hair between their eyes and ears, which is likely why your vet said that it was normal. However, as this is a new development for Jinx, it indicates an imbalance in the body. Powerful flea products like selamectin are a significant burden for the body to eliminate.

Here is the information sheet at Drugs.com for selamectin:
Pruritus (itch) is a side effect, which could lead to hair loss. There are many other possible problems listed.

When a product has many potential side effects, you only want to use it when it is absolutely essential. If your cats' flea problem is controlled, I would investigate less toxic methods of flea control. Toxic topical products are more problematic to house cats, as there is less air circulation in the home, so the cat is exposed to the product to a greater extent.
Regards,
Dr. Sara
Hello @Dr. Sara . My little Jinxie is still. losing hair around her eyes from the Revolution treatment. I had stopped giving it her but. she is still having lasting effects. Is there anything I can do for her or give her to help with getting her fur back? Im sad about this. Thank you!
 

Dr. Sara

Veterinarian
HA! Faculty
Joined
Dec 30, 2018
Messages
290
Dear Anna,
I would also consider an omega fatty acid supplement, such as the Nordic Naturals product. Many cats love the taste, and the fatty acids help hair regrowth and are anti-inflammatory. Make sure it is fine along with Dr. Herman's recommendations.
Stay well,
Sara
 

AnnaH

All Access Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2021
Messages
21
Dear Anna,
I would also consider an omega fatty acid supplement, such as the Nordic Naturals product. Many cats love the taste, and the fatty acids help hair regrowth and are anti-inflammatory. Make sure it is fine along with Dr. Herman's recommendations.
Stay well,
Sara
Thank you for your prompt response , @Dr. Sara. I will. ask Dr. Herman.
 

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